History

Key Stage 3

Programme of Study

The History Department aims to provide students with a broad historical understanding and a raft of transferable skills such as enquiry, analysis and communication. History at BUCHS is both popular and successful and challenges students to become independent learners who can apply their skills in later life.

Over the 2 years, students will develop their historical skills through a range of topics. They will gain an understanding of:

  • Life in the Medieval Period (including the Norman Conquest)
  • The Tudors and the Stuarts
  • The English Civil War
  • The Suffragettes
  • Slavery
  • The First and Second World Wars
  • The Holocaust.

 

Learning/Teaching Approach

Students will develop the following skills:

  • Extended writing which is accurate and relevant to the historical question being asked.
  • Essay writing which is well-structured making use of connectives, producing convincing arguments and reaching judgements.
  • Debating and using subject knowledge to support an argument.

 

Assessment

Students will be assessed in a range of skills:
Explanation of causation, use of historical evidence, the ability to assess change and continuity, historical interpretations and historical significance.

Key Stage 4

Qualification

GCSE

Exam Board and Syllabus

Edexcel GCSE (9-1)

Programme of Study

Paper 1: Thematic study and historic environment (Paper codes: 1HI0/10–12)
10: Crime and punishment in Britain, c1000–present
and Whitechapel, c1870–c1900: crime, policing and the inner city.
Paper 2: Period study and British depth study (Paper codes: 1HI0/20–29)
B4: Early Elizabethan England, 1558–88.
26/27: Superpower Relations and the Cold War, 1941–91
Paper 3: Modern depth study (Paper codes: 1HI0/30–33)
31: Weimar and Nazi Germany, 1918–39

Learning/Teaching Approach

A wide range of teaching and learning techniques are used including the use of historical sources, political cartoons, DVDs, ICT resources and textbooks. Students undertake independent, paired and group work and focus on debating skills, writing skills and essay technique.

Assessment

 

  • Paper 1: Thematic study and historic environment (Paper codes: 1HI0/10–12) 10: Crime and punishment in Britain, c1000–present and Whitechapel, c1870–c1900: crime, policing and the inner city. Written examination: 1 hour and 15 minutes. 30%* of the qualification 52 marks (16 for the historic environment, 36 for the thematic study)
    • Assessment overview
      • Section A: historic environment
        Students answer a question that assesses knowledge plus a two-part question based on two provided sources.
      • Section B: thematic study
        Students answer three questions that assess their knowledge and understanding. The first two questions are compulsory. For the third question, students answer one from a choice of two.

 

 

  • Paper 2: Period study and British depth study (Paper codes: 1HI0/20–29) B4: Early Elizabethan England, 1558–88. 26/27: Superpower Relations and the Cold War, 1941–91 Written examination: 1 hour and 45 minutes, 40%* of the qualification. 64 marks (32 for the period study and 32 for the British depth study)
    • Assessment overview
      • Section A: Period study
        Students answer three questions that assess their knowledge and understanding. The first two questions are compulsory. For the third question, students select two out of three parts.
      • Section B: British depth study
        Students answer a single three-part question that assesses their knowledge and understanding. The first two parts are compulsory. For the third part, students select one from a choice of two.

 

 

  • Paper 3: Modern depth study (Paper codes: 1HI0/30–33) 31: Weimar and Nazi Germany, 1918–39 Written examination: 1 hour and 20 minutes, 30%* of the qualification. 52 marks
    • Assessment overview
      • Section A
        Students answer a question based on a provided source and a question that assesses their knowledge and understanding.
      • Section B
        Students answer a single four-part question, based on two provided sources and two provided interpretations.

 

What it leads to

History can lead to careers such as journalism, jobs in the media, teaching, business, the civil service and the legal profession. This is due to the raft of skills that History students gain and develop, such as using evidence, analysing key issues, making judgements and debating. These transferable skills are highly desirable in today's job market.

Additional Points

 

Tier of Entry

Single Tier.